00069A

1955 MERCEDES-BENZ 300SLR
1955 MILLE MIGLIA WINNER

Regular price R 1,800.00
/

9 in stock

The 1955 MERCEDES-BENZ 300SLR (Sport Leicht-Rennen) designed by engineer Rudolf Uhlenhaut, took Sterling Moss to his greatest victory with a record-breaking 10h7m48sec win at the 'Mille Miglia' in the same year! Most of its drivetrain and chassis were shared with the W196 track car but modified to add standard two-abreast seating and a set of headlights. A brazed steel tube spaceframe chassis carried an ultra-light Elektron magnesium-alloy body and the straight-8 engine under the hood canted to the right by 33-degrees lowering the car's profile for slicker aerodynamics. This created a distinctive bulge on the passenger side of the hood. To add fighting genetics to this 290 km/h (180 mph) 24-hour road/track sports racer desmodromic valves and mechanical fuel injection from the Messerschmitt Bf 109E fighter were also inherited. It is unfortunate that after a catastrophic crash and fire at Le Mans on 12 June 1955, its domination ended prematurely. Only 9 were ever made.

 

AUTHENTICITY : Each drawing is limited to 10 signed and numbered prints regardless of size and comes together with a certificate & 10SERIE 'medallion'

PAPER : Professionally ink printed onto 350gsm Hahnemühle Museum Etching paper to achieve the best color & light fastness.

FRAME :

Profile : A 14 x 34mm (0,55 x 1.33inch) beveled profile made from Obeche (African Maple) which is depended upon for its stability and relative resistance to warping once machined. It is offered in either color black or white.

GLASS :

'Museum Glass' is 'non-reflective' and absorbs damaging UV light to allow over 98% transmission allowing only the best vibrant colors to translate and is advised for all the limited & signed prints.

'Standard' picture framing glass is a 2mm clear float glass. It is inexpensive and will protect your artwork from dust and physical damage.

BACKING :

Full archival acid-free board with 10mm deep-sunk (spacer) in same to create depth and set the artwork back off the glass.